Profile:
tanja meece

This is tanja meece's Profile page. Use it to view tanja meece's comments, other users' replies to these comments, and comments tanja meece has endorsed.

What's Happening Now

March 30, 2013 2:05 am

Consumer ehealth apps, capable of compiling an individuals self-entered data and then generating a printable report would be beneficial to both medical professionals snd their clients and empowering for the client. But, there is a serious drawback involved with this type of tool, once the new wears off will the users become lax about entering information on a regular basis or enter false information to keep from hearing a lecture from their doctor? I have many apps on my smartphone that I have forgotten downloading and have never used or used frequently in the first weeks after downloading them and then lost interest or had little time available, due to one thing or another, to make daily entries into on a regular basis. Those are still great apps to have available, but in my case, they may… more »

…not get the regulsr usage and input necessary to show a pattern of patients’ self-health management and history. « less
April 4, 2013 12:13 am

The self health management apps I have used from Day One is a hydration reminder tool. It has an alarm, musical tones and/or vibration options, an easy to use interface with a variety of liquid measurements corresponding pictures of the cups and sports bottles associated with the ounces or litres held in each.It tracks the daily user input, factoring in weight and height of the user, and creates a graph comparing their daily liquid intake with the suggested daily requirements.It tracks consumption from day to day and week to week. Pretty graphics, ease of use and unobtrusive monitoring and reminders are important bells and whistles.

April 6, 2013 2:17 pm

There are many benefits possible, but a possible long-term benefit might be fewer unnecessary trips to hospital ERS and doctors’ offices. If consumers are able to easily find information online, using apps on phones or communicate by phone, text messages or internet,, live chats and instant messaging, they are better capable of making an informed decision about making those trips. Or a better understanding of how to explain their health problems or symptoms in a manner medical professionals wi understand.

April 8, 2013 1:11 am

My husband has high blood pressure. I downloaded an app from an android app place online for free, called “StressCheck”. It reads your blood pressure by having you place your finger over the camera lens for two minutes. Then reads the data received to pet you know your stress level.
It has proven to be extremely accurate. I know this because I tested it before the nurse put a blood pressure cuff on my arm and took my pulse. The nurse recorded my results and her results and they matched. She tested my husband’s reading from the app hand hers and the results were identical. If that app were capable of linking to the Dr.’s offices then it was could enable tracking of my husband’s blood pressure. I downloaded the app for myself, I was switching and eliminating mediations… more »

…and I was using it three times/day. The reason being I live 150 mlles from my psychiatrist’s office and I was monitoring my stress level and texting her twice a week to let her know how I’d been doing on the new meds regimen.
Blood pressure readings in an office may be a poor example of a person’s general health, especially blood pressure. This type of app is one way of providing a more in depth picture of a consumer’s daily and long-term health. A picture both the provider and patient would be able to share. If linking the app with a computer or printer were possible. « less
April 21, 2013 8:03 pm

Here is an actual example of why we need new regulations. A young couple were in the middle of a nasty divorce. The young man started seeing a psychiatrist. His father worked for his medical insurance provider. The father didn’t want his son to see a psychiatrist. So the father had his son’s checks from the insurance company mailed to his home. The checks were intended to be used by the son to pay his psychiatrist. Instead, the father was destroying them. The son found one of these checks in the father’s garbage. When he and the “shrink”, separately and together, contacted the company and were told there was nothing they could do. The problem has been rectified.

But, the most important fact is this, had the father not been employed by this company, he would… more »

…not have been aware of the fact that his son was seeing a psychiatrist.

There are a lot of parties involved in a consumer’s health care. Will the new regulations be taking examples such as the one I mentioned into consideration when drafting the laws? Consumers will need more than anonymous testing and coded files if their records are going to be made more accessable and private. Encryption codes might help with the privacy issues? « less

March 30, 2013 5:50 pm

Thanks for your comment, tanja meece. How do you think eHealth apps could keep users interested in entering information? For the smartphone apps that you do use all the time, what sort of things keep you interested in using them?

April 4, 2013 9:00 am

Thanks for telling us about a tool that works well for you, tanja meece. So that others know which hydration reminder tool you are referencing, could you share its name?

You mention that unobtrusive monitoring is an important feature to you in a health management app. Does the app work as just a reminder alarm with nice bells and whistles or does the app monitor your health unobtrusively in other ways?

April 6, 2013 9:17 pm

Thank you for your comment, tanja meece. Do you have any suggestions for how the government can identify the uses of PGHD that will achieve these benefits?

April 8, 2013 12:52 pm

Thank you for sharing your experience, tanja meece. What experiences have others had using mobile apps to manage their daily and long-term health?

April 1, 2013 4:17 pm

I am a Type 1 Diabetic, I use Accu-Check 360 to remind me to test my blood sugar even thought I have an Omnipod, but do not put in the results, since I can download them to my PC, seems like double entry. I love Noom for Weight Loss, and FitBit, wish I did not have to use SO MANY APPs to keep track of similar things.

April 3, 2013 10:51 am

PatientsLikeMe has been awarded a $1.9 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to create the world’s first open-participation research platform for the development of patient-centered health outcome measures. Hopefully, operational definitions of experience terms and concepts would be part of this. If not, ONC could sponsor a collaboration to create a dictionary of concepts and terms for the professional and the lay person. In writing my blog – http://www.health-hats.com – I find it very challenging to discuss anything related to the health journey in language that anyone can understand. A major role of a change agent in health is translator

March 30, 2013 2:05 am

Consumer ehealth apps, capable of compiling an individuals self-entered data and then generating a printable report would be beneficial to both medical professionals snd their clients and empowering for the client. But, there is a serious drawback involved with this type of tool, once the new wears off will the users become lax about entering information on a regular basis or enter false information to keep from hearing a lecture from their doctor? I have many apps on my smartphone that I have forgotten downloading and have never used or used frequently in the first weeks after downloading them and then lost interest or had little time available, due to one thing or another, to make daily entries into on a regular basis. Those are still great apps to have available, but in my case, they may… more »

…not get the regulsr usage and input necessary to show a pattern of patients’ self-health management and history. « less
March 28, 2013 10:36 pm

People are often seen as unreliable suppliers of clinically-relevant data about themselves. This needs to be examined and, to the extent it is true, remedied.

For example, clinical vocabulary used by providers is more precise than how patients might speak of their health. How best do we bridge that semantic canyon? Similarly, many people do not understand how to determine when they need urgent care versus self-care or non-urgent care. How do we triage more effectively, involving the patient in the process?

March 31, 2013 1:37 pm

In my opinion, to support personalized medicine, two approaches are required:
1) Full integration of commercial mHealth solutions into EHRs and clinical software. In this way, the PGHD can be also incorporated seamlessly. I believe that cool mHealth solutions that resemble aplications such as Runkeeper can make obeying the care plans fun and new and trendy lifestyle that both the patient and doctor agree on.
2) The structure of data captured in EHRs must be also adapted to support personlized medicine – personal genomics and better identification of candidates for clinical trials. It is described in this book http://www.amazon.com/Medicine-Denial-Lawrence-L-Weed/dp/1456417061 but it seams that not many clinical softwares adopted this approach.